The Kennedy Center

David Mead



Biography

After bouncing around the club scene in a few bands, David Mead took the leap as a solo artist in Nashville, Tennessee in the mid-1990s. A copper-topped kid with a tender heart and wicked sense of humor, he had one unfailing secret weapon - the kind of singing voice that could stop drunks in mid-drink and A & R guys in mid-schmooze. 

In the early 2000s in New York City, Mr. Mead signed a major label deal with RCA, former home to Elvis Presley and David Bowie. Aspiring to similar career longevity and variety, Mr. Mead locked in for a steady climb. Honing a songwriting gift that improbably took in Broadway, Beatles, Prog, and New Wave, then upped the ante to something all his own, he released a pair of critically-acclaimed records, The Luxury Of Time and Mine and Yours. 

Mr. Mead toured throughout Indiana in the mid-2000s, meeting crowds sparse or sold-out with equal gusto, leaving true believers in his wake. When he wasn’t on the road, he was writing, recording (Indiana, Wherever You Are, Tangerine, Almost and Always), and lending songs to screens big (The Sweetest Thing, Boys and Girls) and small (Ed, Private Practice). He was making loads of fans and friends (some of them in high places). Joe Jackson, Fountains Of Wayne, Shelby Lynne, and Ron Sexsmith all feel it too, enough to invite Mr. Mead to share stages and tours.

In 2011, 253 of Mr. Mead’s most-dedicated fans rallied around his Kickstarter campaign in Nashville to raise over $20,000 to fund his new record Dudes. The yield on the investment? Pure pleasure, with humor, mystery, emotional wallop and dudes of all ages lurking behind a hundred unforgettable hooks. “There is no easy way for me to express the gratitude I feel for all the generous support,” Mr. Mead said, “except to try to back it up with what I feel might be my best album to date.”

Watch Past Performances

Video 1/17/2012: David Mead

Nashville-based pop singer-songwriter is best known for his soaring vocals and a highly melodic and emotionally direct style of pop.

David Mead