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[Journey to America Header.]America, the land of the free… the land of plenty… where the streets are paved with gold. Drawn by these mythic images, music's immigrants followed the routes of hundreds of thousands of others, seeking freedom, safety, and opportunity. What they found here was a new energy, exotic rhythms, a vibrant, multi-cultural folk tradition, and audiences hungry for music-in concert halls, in films, and on radio.

Trace their journey, and hear the marvels that they created in this bright new land. Join Leonard Slatkin and the National Symphony Orchestra for a fascinating two-week festival showcasing the works of composers who followed their muse to America. In their music you will hear the story of America-the story of a nation built by seekers of freedom.

Each of these concerts will feature two interpretations of the Star Spangled Banner by composers who were not born in the United States of America.

 

View interactive timeline
Follow the history of great composers who journeyed to America

[Related Resources.]
The Library of Congress
Discover more about many of the composers featured in the festival.

The Holocaust Museum
Many of the composers featured in Journey to America left their countries of origin due to Nazi persecution during World War II. Learn more about the era that prompted so many to leave their homelands and travel to safety in the United States. The Holocaust Museum is America's national institution for the documentation, study and interpretation of Holocaust history.

 

Each of these concerts will feature two interpretations of the Star Spangled Banner by composers who were not born in the United States of America. Learn more about this symbol of freedom at the following two sites.

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House
One of Baltimore's oldest museums is dedicated to the story of Mary Young Pickersgill, who made the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the War of 1812, and inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem that became the National Anthem.

The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History
Home of the original Star-Spangled Banner.


Journey to America: A Musical Immigration
is made possible by a generous grant from